Posts Tagged ‘Android’

February 2018 Development Update

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018 by rdb

We again bring you some of the highlights of the new developments in the past month. This is however not an exhaustive list of changes, which can be obtained from the commit logs in the GitHub repository.

Android developments

We’re happy to announce that the Android port has made great strides forward in the past weeks. Most importantly, there is now a complete Python interpreter added to the Panda3D app, so that Python applications can be run directly from the Android device. Many of the sample programs now run as well as they do on the desktop.

It is now even possible to compile Panda3D entirely on an Android device, using an app that provides a Linux-like terminal environment. One free and open-source example is termux, which provides a package manager that gives access to an impressive suite of software, including the compilers needed to compile Panda3D.

Furthermore, using a bash script that we provide, it is also possible to launch Panda3D from termux and pipe the output from the interpreter app back to the terminal, so that you can develop Panda apps on Android the same way as you would on the desktop.

Eventually, we intend to make it possible to use the new deploy-ng system to produce an Android package from any operating system, making it easy to deploy your application to both desktop and mobile platforms.

In a separate effort, a commercial port of Panda3D to Android has been released on the app store, called Cub3D. This is an impressively complete development environment for Panda3D apps, and can be used today to develop and run Panda apps on Android. (This software is developed by a third-party company that is not affiliated with the Panda3D team.)

Roaming Ralph running on an Android tablet

Roaming Ralph running on an Android tablet

Ball in Maze running on an Android watch with Cub3D

Ball in Maze running on an Android watch with Cub3D



CMake improvements

Behind the scenes, we have been working on adding support for the CMake build system on the cmake branch. CMake is a popular cross-platform build system that is rapidly becoming the de facto standard for open-source projects, and it is eventually intended to replace our own makepanda build script. This will make it easier to build Panda from source and to customize the build process. Last month, the CMake port saw some updates and improvements, bringing us closer to this goal.

Bullet thread safety

Users of the Bullet physics engine were previously encountering crashes when using Bullet in conjunction with the multithreaded render pipeline. This is caused by the fact that the Bullet library is not thread safe. To remedy this, we have added locking in the Panda3D wrapper for Bullet that protects the Bullet library from access by multiple threads, which makes it safe to use the Bullet integration in a multithreaded program.

January 2018 Development Update

Tuesday, February 13th, 2018 by fireclaw

The new year has brought with it new developments to the Panda3D engine, some of which we would like to present to you today. This is however by no means a comprehensive listing of the improvements we’re working on. Stay tuned for more posts, as we’ve got some exciting plans for 2018 ahead!

RenderPipeline light system

The light manager of Tobias Springer’s excellent RenderPipeline project has made its way into the Panda3D codebase. This is a light system designed to be used in conjunction with the GPU light culling and deferred rendering methods provided by the RenderPipeline, and is implemented in C++ for optimal performance. Now that it is included with Panda3D, it is even easier to use the RenderPipeline in your projects as it is no longer necessary to compile any C++ modules to do so—you now simply put the Python module into your project and follow the usual steps from there on out.

This feature is mainly useful from a RenderPipeline setup, but we are continuing to work on bringing the built-in lighting system more closely in line with the RenderPipeline lights. Examples of this are additional light types such as sphere and rectangle area lights and the possibility to set a light’s color temperature.

Input device support

The input-overhaul branch has received plenty of changes again and is day by day getting closer to a state where it can be merged into the master branch. The latest improvements include more devices being supported as well as overall improved handling and mapping of devices’ buttons and axes, such as for joysticks. For Windows users, there is also a new input manager available based on the Windows raw input system, which is used for devices that are not supported under the existing XInput implementation. Panda3D automatically chooses the right implementation to use for a device, so this all happens seamlessly to the developer.

Support for 3D mice has also been added. This is a class of devices that allow movement in six degrees of freedom (thrice as many as a regular mouse), and is particularly used by 3D artists for intuitively navigating a camera around a model or through a scene. This may be of particular use for the various CAD programs that are built around Panda3D.

Android developments

Android support is actively being worked on and great strides have already been made in this area. Stay tuned for the next post, in which we will have some exciting announcements to make on this front!